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Journey of Chapainawabganj mangoes starts , destination the UK

Farmers pack mangoes of Langra and Fazli varieties in Chapainawabganj to export the fruit to Walmart-owned supermarket chain Asda in the United Kingdom. Photo: Star

Farmers pack mangoes of Langra and Fazli varieties in Chapainawabganj to export the fruit to Walmart-owned supermarket chain Asda in the United Kingdom. Photo: Star

Mangoes from Chapainawabganj yesterday started their maiden journey for the United Kingdom, where they would be stocked on the shelves of Walmart-owned supermarket chain Asda.

Basirul Islam, owner of Barkullah Traders, has sent 2,000 kilogrammes of mangoes to Dhaka-based fresh agro product exporter Dip International, which would then ship them to the UK.

“I am hoping to get premium prices from the export markets,” he said, adding that he sent 1,500 kgs of the Fazli variety mango and 500 kgs of the Langra variety.

Islam’s mango consignment holds great hope for the district whose general population are heavily dependent on the summer fruit for their livelihood.

Some 24,260 hectares of land are devoted to mango orchards in Chapainawabganj, which bear 2.30 lakh tonnes of the fruit every year.

Islam got a helping hand from the scientists of Regional Horticulture Research Station (RHRS) while collecting the mangoes from the district’s different orchards.

Only mangoes grown under the latest fruit-bagging technology were selected.

 In this technology, the fruits are covered with specialised bags during  the pre-harvest period.

This exercise, although laborious, improves the visual quality of the fruit by promoting peel colouration, reduces blemishes and also has a beneficial effect on the internal fruit quality.It also reduces the incidence of disease, insects, bird damage, sunburn of the skin, mechanical damage and agrochemical residue on the fruit.

All of this increases the commercial value of the harvest, according to studies. The technology was introduced commercially this year after tests at the orchard of the RHRS gave favourable results.

No additional pesticide sprays are needed once the bags are placed on the fruit, Sorof Uddin, senior scientific officer at the RHRS, said.

If the practice becomes more widespread, the use of harmful insecticides, fungicides and pesticides on the huge trees can be reduced largely, he added.

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Report: Rabiul Hasan
Source: Daily Star

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